Western Trivia: African-Americans in the Old West

History tells us that at least 15%, and possibly up to 33%, of cowboys in The Old West were African-American. Among them was William Pickett, who invented the trick we now call bull-dogging—catching and throwing a steer—though Bill’s habit of biting the cow’s lip to control it is no longer practiced. (Not too surprising, IMHO.) … Continue reading Western Trivia: African-Americans in the Old West

Young Women Homesteaders and The Promise Of The West – Letters To Home

Wonderful stories! Reblogged on giffordmacshane.com

THE CHRONICLES OF HISTORY

In today’s post I will be sharing some letters from women homesteaders in the United States at the beginning of the 1900s. The Homestead Act allowed adults to work land out west in order to own it after a period of time. Their stories are inspiring and enlightening.

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1998 – Paddy Clancy, Irish folk musician dies.

A great singer with a great song…

Stair na hÉireann | History of Ireland

Paddy Clancy, was an Irish folk singer best known as a member of the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem. In addition to singing and storytelling, Clancy played the harmonica with the group, which is widely credited with popularising Irish traditional music in the United States and revitalising it in Ireland. He also started and ran the folk music label Tradition Records, which recorded many of the key figures of the American folk music revival.

Clancy was one of eleven children and the eldest of four boys born to Johanna McGrath and Bob Clancy in Carrick-on-Suir, Co Tipperary.

Clancy died at home of lung cancer at the age of 76. He was buried, wearing his trademark white cap, in the tiny village of Faugheen, near Carrick-on-Suir.

Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam dilis.

‘The Wild Rover’

I’ve been a wild rover for many’s the year
I’ve spent all me money…

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